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Bernie Sanders LEAVES the Democrat Party

Updated on July 28, 2016
RJ Schwartz profile image

I'm on the right side of politics and enjoy a good debate on government, the economy, and the rights of the people.

The ink is barely dry on the official nomination papers declaring Hillary Clinton as the 2016 Democratic Presidential nominee. The Party is in the midst of a scandal that will continue to have negative ramifications over a year-long DNC e-mail hack. The chairwoman, in an unprecedented move, stepped down from the leadership position and went to work for Hillary Clinton’s campaign. And now, before Hillary even makes her acceptance speech, in what can only be described as the ultimate vote of “no confidence,” Senator Bernie Sanders abruptly quits the Democratic Party.

Bernie Used the Democrats

Bernie Sanders, who has always been an Independent member of Congress, only joined the Party to run for the nomination. His views have always been closer to a Socialist leaning; much further left than any Democrat candidate, but he needed a larger audience to be heard, so he joined. Now, after being defeated on so many levels he’s quickly breaking ties with the Party and heading back to Vermont and carry on in his position as a Senator as an Independent. The irony of the story is the fact that Bernie has encouraged his supporters to turn their support to candidate Clinton. On paper this sounds reasonable since he has always been closely aligned with the Democratic Party and has been endorsed by high-level Party members in his past Senate campaigns. Yet, despite the coziness, he always seemed to have difficulty calling himself a Democrat outright, even during the presidential run. In the end, he’s pushing people to support the Democrat agenda, perhaps hoping that his input moved the Party platform more to the left.

Back and Forth

The recent Wikileak e-mail drop clearly demonstrated that the DNC was actively working against Senator Sanders in his quest for the seat. As far back as April, Sanders had been vocalizing what he felt was happening and former DNC chairwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz responded to his accusations sharply. She called him out as someone who had no understanding of the Democratic Party and highlighted how he only joined to run for President. Yet, after the e-mails were released, the tables turned and Sander’s was vindicated. But, now it appears that pendulum is once again in motion, swinging the other direction and giving some validation to Schultz’s statements. Bernie Sanders only joined the party to benefit himself and his own aspirations for higher office; which didn’t line up with the ideals of the Democratic Party. What’s again ironic is that his demands for changes within the Democratic Party leadership are continuing; even though he’s no longer part of that organization by his own choice.

What Happens Now?

There still remain the 13 million people who came out and voted for Sanders in the state primaries; what will become of them? Candidate Clinton certainly hopes that the parting words of Bernie Sanders were enough to encourage them to move to her side of the bench, but at this point it’s unclear on what they will do. Different sources have projected their version of where the bulk of them would move, but after this new announcement, those projections could change. Several scenarios could emerge over the next few days, all with negative ramifications to the Party. Sander’s supporters could see the move as a sign from their champion to also abandon the Democratic Party; possibly for good. Regardless of his earlier speech, this action will most likely speak louder to voters. Alternately his supporters may see his quitting the Party as a protest against the many misgivings that were handed to him along the way and go fully against Mrs. Clinton and even possibly turn to Donald Trump just to see her ultimately lose the election; sort of a payback approach. Or, his supporters, many of the young, may just quit politics altogether. He quit, therefore they will follow his lead and quit too.

Bernie's Timing

His choice to make the announcement prior to Clinton making her acceptance speech was a strategically sound move. Reports that his delegates and supporters are already leaving the convention is huge groups, leaving large gaps of empty seats in the hall, won’t help the “unity” narrative the DNC is trying to show. The longstanding friction between the Clinton camp and Bernie’s supporters will most certainly come to a head in the next few days, and massive protests are expected. Bernie appears to be using this parting shot moment to cement the fact with voters that the DNC is corrupt and by exiting it now, he’s demonstrating leadership.

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  • profile image

    Old Poolman 11 months ago

    I don't know if it is true, but it was reported this morning the Dem's are advertising on Craigslist for people to come fill the empty chairs at the convention hall. They are willing to pay $50 to anyone who will do this.

  • Dont Taze Me Bro profile image

    Banned cause of pissants promisem and deantraylor 11 months ago from TWO OF THE MANY LYING LIB CRYBABIES OF HUB PAGES

    Is this not proof Sanders is a nut case?

    Vote for me, not Hillary.

    Then...

    Vote for Hillary, even though she and the DNC cheated me out of the nomination, and wait, btw, I am leaving the Democrat party, but you, my supporters, you stay there with the liars and cheats, vote for them, while I go independent.

    Crazy Bernie, I guess he really is crazy.

  • lovemychris profile image

    Yes Dear 11 months ago from Cape Cod, USA

    He's as big a charlatan as Trump. Both used the parties for advancement. No morals. No integrity. No solid core. Fly with the wind people.

    Let's see them be honest for a change.

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Nice hearing from you Leslie - thanks for your opinion. I agree, Sanders is a charlatan and used the Democratic Party solely for his own advancement. His exit clearly demonstrates that. Trump on the other hand, is still "in play" so I guess we'll see.

  • profile image

    Old Poolman 11 months ago

    Rule number one - Never trust a Politician, and that includes all of them.

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    You nailed that one OP

  • breakfastpop profile image

    breakfastpop 11 months ago

    Bernie was never right for America, but he was treated very badly.

  • MizBejabbers profile image

    MizBejabbers 11 months ago

    Well, what do you expect? Bernie wasn't a card-carrying Democrat. He joined the party to just use it as a means to the White House. When that failed, he picked up his toys and went home. I have no sympathy for the man. He got what he deserved.

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    MizB....please sit down before you read further.....I agree with you......he he

  • breakfastpop profile image

    breakfastpop 11 months ago

    I agree, as well.

  • Jodah profile image

    John Hansen 11 months ago from Queensland Australia

    Not being American, I know nothing. Are there any other choices apart from Clinton and Trump? Elmo, Big Bird..anything would be better.

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Come on there brother...don't get involved in our politics - it's the only fun we have left! Ha ha ha

  • Randy Godwin profile image

    Randy Godwin 11 months ago from Southern Georgia

    Isn't Trump doing the same thing Bernie did? Donald was once a Democrat but he went 180 degrees, not 90 degrees as Bernie did. Trump is funny though. :)

  • Neil Sperling profile image

    Neil Sperling 11 months ago from Port Dover Ontario Canada

    Bernie has some amazing ideals that fit my beliefs big time. I wrote Bernie a letter, as a hub...... to encourage my support of the ideals he pushed. strongest.

    Keep on promoting radical change... by radical I mean open minded solutions. Cheers

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    DNC CEO and CFO both step down today - fallout on the email leak continues - communications director gone and more axes to fall - sounds like everyone involved in round #1 will be out of work - can't wait until Round #2

  • Randy Godwin profile image

    Randy Godwin 11 months ago from Southern Georgia

    Now Trump is saying he won't support Ryan or McCain in their reelection bids. And still more RNC officeholders say they won't support Trump either. Even one of Christies former main campaign managers said she'll support Hillary. These things are unheard of in modern election history.

  • Neil Sperling profile image

    Neil Sperling 11 months ago from Port Dover Ontario Canada

    You'll love this clip - Jill Stein interview - July 31st

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEgYzAyGOHg

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Randy - My interpretation of this follows the "revenge is sweet" narrative - since Trump has exposed the Globalists within the GOP for who they truly are and who the truly serve, they are even more angry and will stop at nothing to see him defeated -----The leaders of this nation are rolling in their graves-----rather than have your party win the election, they'd rather sabotage it to protect their own special interests.

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Neil - thanks for the link. It really has the feel like the producer wants to lay out the narrative that the Third Party candidates are going to influence this year's election. Jill is actually polling between 2.5 and 3.5 percent. I wrote an informative Hub on both her and the Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson.

    https://hubpages.com/politics/Spoltlighting-the-Th...

    Her platform is amazingly "out-there"

  • The Dirt Farmer profile image

    Jill Spencer 11 months ago from United States

    Jill Stein's platform is "out there"? Have you read the RNC's? It's not only odd, but oddly out of touch.

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Under her energy plan we'd move off all fossil fuels and nuclear power - please show me how we will get enough energy for the nation to survive and stay competitive in the world? How exactly does a nation "take power away from Capitalists" without an abrupt shift in national identity?

    The plethora of social programs she wants implemented would cost much more than the government takes in - would you propose a massive increase in taxes? How long before the business owners closed up shop and drove unemployment sky high?

    When someone puts forth a platform that can't be funded, I call it "out there."

  • The Dirt Farmer profile image

    Jill Spencer 11 months ago from United States

    Her social programs certainly could be funded, as could those Sanders proposed, but the US would have to change its priorities, and God knows we need to. We also need to tax those who can most afford it. The RNC platform calls for protecting offshore accounts vigorously. Who's that in aid of? Corporations who want to avoid taxes on the massive amount of profits they make, that's who. As for moving off fossil fuels, that is not only do-able, it's imperative. Check out http://web.stanford.edu/class/e297c/trade_environm...

    It's an interesting read. --Jill

  • Randy Godwin profile image

    Randy Godwin 11 months ago from Southern Georgia

    Are you in favor of the usual conservative "Trickle Down" economics, RJ?

  • Randy Godwin profile image

    Randy Godwin 11 months ago from Southern Georgia

    I agree with Jill in that new technology will soon reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. I'm a former dirt farmer myself and there's a solar electric 'crop" located near me. We'll soon see more of these solar panels down here in southern Georgia, I'll wager.

  • Neil Sperling profile image

    Neil Sperling 11 months ago from Port Dover Ontario Canada

    Confessions of a former covert CIA agent - Amaryllis Fox

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnEKEfkdrOU

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Jill - I'm not a supporter of all the GOP policies. I agree that some of them need amending.

    In response to "the US would have to change its priorities" - that's a huge hurdle - one I just don't see America being ready to jump.

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Randy - As soon as someone develops a new technology that is more cost-effective and efficient than what we have, things will change. I fully expect to see that happen someday. What I don't agree with is government mandating the changes to our energy policies. The free market has always been able to move the world ahead, and yes profits are the motivation for it. Telling citizens that they need to use less power and pay more for it, just because someone decides in their opinion, that's what's best for all citizens doesn't sit well with me.

  • MizBejabbers profile image

    MizBejabbers 11 months ago

    What's aggravating is that we have the alternative energies and they are cheap enough to use today, but all the government red tape has made them appear to be too expensive. Probably most of this is thanks to big oil and current generating companies like coal and nuclear that don't want to be replaced by the competition of cheaper energy sources. My sources for this statement are current employees of some these companies with whom my husband, a retired broadcast engineer stays in contact. He did have to deal with most of these companies in his career, and some even offered him a job.

    Check the laws in some states and see that it is unlawful to go off the grid or to build a new home off the grid. You may be penalized and made to hook back up. Also, electric cars have been around for 50 or more years. Just now have people independently wealthy enough come along to fight the gasoline industry, for example, the Tesla.

  • Randy Godwin profile image

    Randy Godwin 11 months ago from Southern Georgia

    RJ--Read MizBejabbers comment as it includes part of my response to your last comment to me. Big business controls our very lifestyle more than government ever will, although those in government are often in their pockets. Trump represents the very epitome of big business and will give them massive tax breaks if the usual Reaganomics is instituted in the usual way.

    We do have the technology to seriously cut back on fossil fuels now, but big oil would not reap the huge profits if we were to do so. As far as us outsourcing many jobs is concerned, many of Trumps products and made in other countries, Mexico--yes the country he 's threatening to wall out--Bangladesh, China and the list goes on. Do you think Donald is going to close those plants down and move back to America if he's elected? Do you Really?

  • RJ Schwartz profile image
    Author

    Ralph Schwartz 11 months ago from Idaho Falls, Idaho

    You both make great points - I don't think any rational person would disagree that the government has the fix in on many topics. But specifically on green energy, humor me if you might for just a moment.

    Barack Obama, clearly a pr0-green energy President dumped billions of dollars into Green Energy companies. He has the EPA under his control. He has the bully pulpit and used it widely to drive Green Energy programs.

    What happened? The Democrats are the enemy of big oil right? Why didn't Obama just change the rules at the same time he pushed his renewable energy program?

    Complete and almost total failure of every company involved - even with heavy subsidies it didn't work.

    He's currently regulating the coal industry out of business - lots of unemployment - people shifted to Natural Gas fired plants.

    Looking further back - since 1973 US Agencies have spent over $150 Billion on renewable energies but solar is only producing a mere 0.2% of the US Electric Total Production.

    I'd enjoy seeing some evidence to support the technology you cite that would allow us to cut back on fossil fuels with no change or a savings in cost. Changing to a more expensive solution doesn't really make sense to most people who are already just scraping by in the poor economy we're been suffering through.

  • Randy Godwin profile image

    Randy Godwin 11 months ago from Southern Georgia

    Do you think the drastic drop in fuel prices--just coincidentally under Obama's terms of course--was due to Green energy getting off the ground, RJ? Do you also believe Green energy was more of a choice during the Bush/Cheney years of vast oil profits? Since the latter dudes were oil men, did you see a conspiracy then?

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