Police Issue Warning to Parents of Virtual Kidnapping Scams

Updated on April 22, 2018
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Kym L. Pasqualini is a freelance writer and founder of Nation's Missing Children Organization and National Center for Missing Adults.

Incidents of “virtual kidnapping are on the rise throughout the country.
Incidents of “virtual kidnapping are on the rise throughout the country.

You receive a phone call and hear the voice of someone you don’t recognize. They tell you they have your child and will kill them unless you pay a ransom – they direct you not to call police or you will never see your child again.

What would you do?

You tell the person on the other end of the phone not to hang up. You don’t want to disconnect with the one person that can reunite you with your child. You plead for your child’s safe return. “Please don’t hurt her. I will do whatever you want,” you say. And, you would!

They demand you go to the bank and wire a ransom of several thousand dollars. Do you call the police? Do you pay the ransom and hope some thug will return your child to you safe?

A child going missing is every parent’s worst nightmare, and for those who do have a missing child - living with such ambiguity is said to be the most traumatic of human experiences.

Sounds like a situation that only happens in the movies, right? Or, something that only happens to the wealthiest.

According to Newsweek, the Seattle Police Department is issuing warnings to parents that scammers are targeting parents and demanding a ransom in exchange for the safe return of children they kidnapped . . . well, virtually kidnapped. Police throughout the country are following suit.

A child going missing is a parent’s worst nightmare.
A child going missing is a parent’s worst nightmare.

On March 8, 2017, in Ravensdale, Kings County, approximately 30 miles southeast of Seattle, a mother drops her children off at the school bus. Shortly thereafter, she receives a phone call from a man who threatened to kill her child if she didn’t pay a ransom.

The mother was able to reach out to the school to make sure her children were there. The school confirmed they safe.

King’s County Sherriff’s Office told ABC News, this was the first reported incident in their jurisdiction.

In another case, a woman called a father “hysterically crying” claiming she was his daughter and was kidnapped. A man then got on the phone and told the dad if he didn’t pay a ransom, he would hurt his daughter.

Officers in Denver have responded to several reports of kidnappings. In a press release issued by the Denver Police Department, police say the caller demands a monetary payment in exchange for the release of the victim’s child. The caller dials the parents in the afternoon and demands the ransom to be wired to a bank.

After investigating the recent incidents in Denver, they determined the kidnappings were false and all children involved in the incidents were found safe.

Virtually Kidnapped Daughter

On Monday, April 16th, Sean Hollister was at his residence in Longmont, Colorado, about 15 miles northeast of Boulder, and received a frightening call from his 11-year old daughter who he thought was at school.

“My daughter was in tears, sobbing,” Hollister told the Times-Call. “I thought she was in trouble or something. She said, ‘Dad, I’m sorry I let this happen,’ which is exactly what she would say,” Hollister said.

“I said, ‘What’s wrong,’ and I offered up her name, so he knew my kid’s name,” Hollister said a man got on the phone and told him, “I got your daughter in a truck. She is on her way to Mexico.”

When Hollister told the man, he was calling the police, the girl came back on the phone screaming. “Daddy, they are cutting me. Don’t call 911.”

Hollister was able to call police on his cell phone. “The caller told Hollister to get his wallet and identification and promptly leave the house.

Victims of “virtual kidnapping” describe the incident as traumatic.
Victims of “virtual kidnapping” describe the incident as traumatic.

Hollister’s postman was in the yard when he walked outside. “I’m mouthing ‘Help me,’ and he is freaking out,” said Hollister.

Longmont police showed up at his home fast and they took over from there and the caller hung up. Officers quickly determined Hollister’s daughter was safe.

The traumatized father would later find out the callers were trying to pull off a “virtual kidnapping” scam.

“The gap between the cops getting there and finding out my daughter is okay was terrifying,” said Hollister. “Who would think someone would be that cruel.”

Hollister’s caller had a Mexico number, but police say it is possible the caller was local and hijacked the number to appear like the call was made from out of the country.

In yet another case, a woman received a frantic that her brother had been kidnapped, injured and bleeding out, demanding thousands of dollars through a wire to return him safely. She was able to reach her brother on another phone and never paid any money, but a clear sign anyone can be a victim of this type of horrific scam.

According to FBI kidnapping expert, Agent Eric Arbuthnot, several organizations use these scams regularly to make money.

“Thousands of dollars in ransom,” said Arbuthnot. “And you’re talking about a criminal organization that is capable of doing more than one kidnapping at a time.”

According to Arbuthnot many of the cases have been happening on the West coast and along the border involving criminal organizations from Mexico, some claiming to be members of the cartel.

The FBI has seen recent increases in California, Nevada, New York, and Texas.

Monroe Police Department in Connecticut said by using social media, scammers can identify a victim, look up relatives, and reference names of family members and friends to make the call appear legitimate.

FBI Supervisory Agent Christopher Johnson said his office in St. Louis, Missouri, deals with these types of crimes. “Scammers will often mention specific facts about the parent or victim, likely from information they were able to obtain online.”

Authorities say about one in five kidnapping cases are successful resulting in the criminal getting their ransom and not getting caught. While extortion has been around for decades, virtual ransom kidnapping calls are increasing around the country.

With this emerging scam, the FBI has launched a nationwide campaign to warn parents to fight back against “virtual kidnapping.”

FBI Special Agent Glenn Milnor warns parents about virtual kidnapping.
FBI Special Agent Glenn Milnor warns parents about virtual kidnapping.

If you receive a virtual kidnapping ransom call

Unlike traditional kidnapping schemes, a “virtual kidnapper” has not actually kidnapped anyone. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation, if you receive a call from an individual demanding a ransom for the safe return of a kidnap victim, it is suggested you quickly evaluate the following to determine if you are receiving a legitimate ransom call:

  • Caller insists you stay on the phone.
  • Call does not come from your child’s cell phone.
  • Caller tries to stop you from contacting the kidnap victim.
  • Call includes demand for ransom to be paid via wire transfer.
  • Ransom amounts may decrease quickly.



Knowing what to do

Police say it is best to hang up the phone but:

  • If you engage the caller, don’t call out your loved one’s name.
  • Deliberately try to slow the situation down and ask to speak to your child directly.
  • Ask “proof of life” questions like, “How do I know my loved one is okay?”
  • To gain confirmation if your child is an actual kidnapping victim, ask questions only your child would know such as the name of a pet.
  • Listen very closely to the voice of the person speaking, if possible record the call.
  • If possible, have someone else try to call your child’s cell phone, school, by text, social media, etc., to confirm their safety.
  • To buy time, repeat the caller’s request and tell them you are writing down the demand, or tell the caller you need time to make arrangements.
  • Don’t agree to pay a ransom, by wire or in person.
  • Don’t deliver money in person.
  • Immediately call your local FBI office and police.

According to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC), as of March 31, 2017, there were 86,618 active missing person cases in the FBI database, with 8, 792 entered as involuntary.

Experts agree that an actual kidnapping with a ransom demand is quite rare but all experts urge parents to be vigilant.

To read the FBI warning, please click here.

© 2018 Kym L Pasqualini

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